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Readers Respond: Smoking Withdrawal Tips - Readers Respond

Responses: 407

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Updated February 18, 2014

Think About How Smoking Hurts Our Bodies

I have not smoked in 5 days. I'm taking zyban. It works pretty good, but you still have to have willpower. My side affects are insomnia, upset stomach, coughing and constantly having to clear my throat. I'm hoping a decongestant will help. Also I have no appetite. I do chew a lot of gum though and drink a lot of water. Anytime I feel a little frustrated I just lay down and close my eyes and think about all the reasons I needed to quit. There is no easy fix for this addiction. You have to truly want to quit. Just saying it over and over is not enough. You have to tell yourself its now or never. Just think about all of the un-fixable damage smoking does to our bodies. That's a great reason to quit if you want to live long enough to see your kids grow up. Good luck to everyone out there. We can all do this together!
—Guest Jenny

"A Cigarette", Like Just One?

The one thing that has kept me from going for "a cigarette" is they are sold in a pack for a reason. ONE IS NEVER ENOUGH! I may think I want "a cigarette", as in just one for old times sake or because it would be taste good but...... I make myself face the fact that "one" won't ever be "GOOD ENOUGH". For two minutes I'll think I'm in heaven but within ten minutes I'll be trying to justify when, why and where I should have the next one. That becomes a frustratingly long, slow journey back to the beginning as you justify each and every "just one more" and find yourself once again "a smoker". So, bottom line for me is "one" just isn't ever going to be enough. Remembering that helps me to continue to chose none.
—Guest JP

Fruit and Nuts

As the time goes by, I'm trying walnuts as a distraction - for both smoking and not eating too much candy! Lots of fruit, too - that's still working.
—Guest CWDC

One Day at a Time

I quit for 8 years, second time around was harder because I knew how hard it was to quit. Honestly, I am member of AA and it sounds funny, but truly One Day At A Time is working. I can do anything for one day. No promises for tomorrow, but today I am not smoking. I am also using Chantix and have an awesome support group. I know cravings will go away, it's still hard, but exercise and water help immensely. I have 4 days under my belt, but that is awesome for me. I am an aerobics instructor who is REALLY looking forward to teaching a class without getting so out of breath!
—dporter1967

Allow Anything But Smoking

Candy, potato chips, fast food, tomatoes with salt, fritos and bean dip, Sweet Tarts, licorice...I've allowed myself absolutely anything and everything I want whenever I want it in order to beat this. My best friend's response to my method was, "don't blow up," meaning don't get fat. my response was, "fat I can fix. lung cancer I cannot." She said she'd make me a t-shirt with that quote on Day 30. it may have to be an xxxl shirt, but then I'll beat that, too.
—Guest Susan

One Month Later...

I'd say this is getting easier but, as I've seen in other responses, the mental part is the hardest. Boy, that's for sure! I distract myself with the no smoking forums, writing emails, doing things at home. I haven't smoked for just about one month and am hoping upon hope I'll get over the mental part sooner rather than later!
—Guest Stopped

Quitting

I am well into my third week of not smoking. I'm using the patch to calm my irritability. I find it makes me feel better to tell myself "I am now a nonsmoker" rather than I quit smoking.. nobody likes a quitter! Associating quitting with your favorite pastime doesn't sit well. My 2 cents.
—Guest Chris

Lots of fruit.

I'm at 24 days without smoking. When I get home from work (prime time smoking time for me) I wash fruit, put it in a colander in the kitchen sink and snack on that half the night. That's what's helping me right now. I also use peppermints during the day. This is hard, hard, hard. The withdrawal wasn't great but the brain keeps wanting a smoke. That's the hardest part for me! But, I'm getting through it by keeping busy, partially through forums like this!
—Stopped

Nicotine Gum and Food

I know Allen Carr disagrees but I don't believe I could have done it without the gum. And I quit before for 3 years using the same method, and I started again. Maybe he's right that people do start again but I would rather smoke 3 months out of the year than 12 so if that's the way it has to be then that's the way it has to be. Although I did stop chewing prematurely and I experienced a full month of withdrawal, more than the last time I quit smoking. It was tough and I recall two instances where I actually made the decision to cheat, but luckily the cravings passed and I stayed on the wagon and didn't follow through on the decision. I also ate more, and I certainly did not hold back. I paid for it in weight gain but to me it's easier to lose weight than to quit smoking so I am currently working on that and I feel amazing. I still have cravings but they're nowhere nearly as powerful as they were once I stopped the gum. I DEFINITELY DO NOT MISS IT!
—Fsharpp

Smoking Cessation Support Forum

Whenever possible, during all trigger times, I would read the information and posts in the forum in About.com -Smoking Cessation and post and read and post and read. It has been over four years since I have smoked.
—LindaQuit

Role Model

I teach school,and am a grandmother of two great kids. I smoked for over 40 years and quit with Chantix this summer. It's been 72 days since I lit up and I feel cleaner,smell better,and want to keep it up. There are days I'm very tempted. But,I keep busy,read,go for a walk,or take deep breaths. I've put on 7 pounds though,and that is discouraging.I can't afford a whole new wardrobe! I'm hoping the weight will become more manageable once I'm very secure in my non-smoking world.
—otherg

One Day at a Time

re Edwina. The brain fog is normal for the first few weeks as the body rids itself of carbon monoxide. Just knowing that it was an actual thing; not imagined made me feel a lot better. I read Allen's book too and am almost a week smoke free. Very little in the way of withdrawal symptoms and feel good but sure would like "just one". I am counting on time making that urge cease to exist and find it very helpful to read others experiences to motivate me further.
—Guest TessK

My Tips

This is my 4th attempt. I knew after every time I slipped I was going to try again. It's not the easy way to do it. The first time I tried a hypnotist and a prescription inhaler. I needed all the help I could get. It was extremely hard for me on my first try. I cried, I was grouchy, irritable, a little unhappy and depressed.Especially the first 2 weeks. It got easier. I switched to the gum nicorette. I started with 4mg and then went dowm to 2. I really could have weaned myself down and eventually get off the gum all together, but I did'nt. I ended up not smoking for 2 years. Then something happened that got me upset and I used it as an excuse to smoke again. Big mistake. I was at the point before I slipped that I actually really liked not smoking anymore. There was a freedom to it and so many more wonderful reasons. This is now my 4 maybe 5 attempt. The psychological part of my addiction is the hardest. I use the tips and tools on this site. I pray. The desire to not smoke is stronger.
—jesra

Exercise Your Willpower!

I have found willpower - something I've never had before. I'm saving money - that's a big incentive!
—Guest CWDC

Distractions Help

I'm on day 12 with no cigarettes. I still have cravings but I am taking Chantix and that helps. Distraction is the only thing that helps me. I get on the internet (as I see others do) or clean something. At work I'm fine, at home w/o smoking is the hardest part for me. I usually nap a lot on the weekends!
—Guest CWDC

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Smoking Withdrawal Tips - Readers Respond

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